Thursday, December 30, 2010

Back to Wheeler Farm

Old buildings, old cars and old machinery.  Yeah, I like old things (which is why I like myself so much).  I got this picture when I visited Wheeler Farm this summer.
I know someone out there has a much better idea than I do as to what this contraption did, but I was just fascinated at the complexity of it.




9 comments:

A Paperback Writer said...

I'll try to get my parents to look at it. They, having grown up on farms, can identify every piece of antique farming equipment known to the western world. Many times, if I couldn't identify something, I've snapped a photo of it and shown them. They can always explain, and tell me about using one or someone they knew who had used one.

Max said...

Cool, it'll be interesting to know what it did.

Karen S. said...

Funny how a lot of those old things just seemed to have so much stuff to them! There's a place called Pioneer Village not far from me that I visited (they are open to the public only one weekend every year) I had many questions for the old guys...and they love being asked anything! Very cool photo that totally describes what the heck is it?

Max said...

Hopefully Writer's parents will be able to shed some light on what it is.

Anonymous said...

It is a early ground driven side delivery hay rake.

Keith
CuttingFarm

Anonymous said...

It is a ground driven side delivery hay rake. The style is not in use much today, although you can still find a few 1960' vintage models in use

keith

Max said...

Keith - thanks, it's nice to have a little history on it.

John said...

It is a side-delivery hay rake, common on farms before the 1950s. Originally designed to be drawn by horses, many were eventually adapted to tractor towing as tractors replaced farm draft animals. This rake replaced the earlier 'dump' style rakes that left transverse rows of hay. The side delivery rake left rows of the hay in line with the direction of rake movement, making it easier to bring in from the field, either by hay loader/wagon or by a hay baler. jenders-bethesda md

Max said...

John - Thanks for the info.