Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Thematic Photographic: Neighborhood Transitions

This is the SW corner of 2100 South and 1100 East in the Sugarhouse area of Salt Lake City, within walking distance of my house.  Up until 2006 it was a busy business corner, with an eclectic collection of a dozen or so small, local businesses.
A developer bought up the property, moved the businesses out of there and leveled the entire corner, promising a corner with open green, retail, office and residential spaces.  Then the Great Recession hit, the money dried up and the neighborhood was left with what has been named The Sugarhole.  Only now is there again talk about putting something there, although downsized from the original plan.
I give you “a neighborhood in transition”.  The first and third pictures were taken in 2007, the comparison ones were taken this week. As things progress, if and when, you will probably get to see the continuing transition.

6 comments:

A Paperback Writer said...

I never did see what was wrong with the old buildings. Oh well.
At least the hole is filled in.

Bob Scotney said...

Sounds familiar, we've had areas in transition for 20 years. Some when finished are ready to be transformed again. Too depressing to photograph for me.

Alexia said...

Such a great take on the theme. Those "empty corner" shots look quite desolate and sad - hope the new development gets under way soon!

Twain12 said...

great transition photos...i'm always amazed by how much changes when i visit my family in germany every few years.

Karen S. said...

That building didn't look so bad, and that corner is lovely really, with the trees out lining it...superb spot, and hopefully the person in charge has pleasantly thrilling works in motion as you post this! It will always amaze me why anyone thinks knocking down/wasting hard spent labor/materials is the answer to make something better...is that what they really thought?

Max said...

It was a hodge-podge of old buildings all interconnected, but it had a great atmosphere. Very local, very mom & pop. Of course there were the arguments of repairs needed, cost and all that other crap, but the people who had their businesses there loved the place. In the end, as often is the case in the U.S., age and history lost out and we're getting something "newer and better". Maybe, but something was still lost.