Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Boston Library and Fenway Park

We got downtown and, guess what? It was raining. We got to the library and had no idea where to look for the collection of my grandfather's writings, so we ask the gentleman at the information counter. Fully expecting him to say "Of course I know where the Max Sartin writings are, we all do! They're right there, in the middle of the main hall. By the way, can I get your autographs?", I was surprised when it took him several tries to find it on the computer. We found it in Rare Books Department, which was not only closed on Saturday, but also requires that you set up a viewing in advance. Bummer, we didn't get to see the collection, but at least we know that it really exists, and we got to wander around the library. Having used up just a fraction of the time we allotted for the library, we decided to hop the T and head over to Fenway Park. There was going to be a game later that day, so you could see them gearing up for it, the scalpers were out and we were asked at least a dozen times if we wanted tickets. We walked around the area, got some good pictures and then headed out to the family reunion.

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5 comments:

Jannx said...

Very nice pictures of your Boston adventure. I'm looking forward to seeing more pictures. I told myself that one of these days I would take a trip to Boston.

A Paperback Writer said...

Cool library!
So, what do you think is in Grandpa Max's collection? Do you know what he wrote about? Anarchy? Or is this a different relative?
Spiffy stuff.

Max said...

Jannx,
Boston is a great place, being back there made me kind of homesick, even though I've lived in Utah most of my life. I don't see myself ever moving back there, I like Utah too much, but I am greateful for having spent my childhood there.

Writer,
Yup, Grandpa Max was the anarchist, his collection consists of copies of his underground anarchist paper (L'Adunata dei Refrattari) and corrospondence with other anarchists, including Sacco and Vanzetti, to Massachusettes anarchists that were railroaded for a murder.

A Paperback Writer said...

I just ran that through babelfish and it came out "Assembly of the Refractory ones," which sounds like a group of 8th graders being told they have to take CRTs.
I am amused.

Max said...

My grandfather is laughing in his grave! Or I should say laughing in his urn. I looked up refractory online, got this from Merriam-Webster Online;
Main Entry: 1re·frac·to·ry
Pronunciation: \ri-ˈfrak-t(ə-)rē\
Function: adjective
Etymology: alteration of refractary, from Latin refractarius, irregular from refragari to oppose, from re- + -fragari (as in suffragari to support with one's vote)
Date: 1606
1: resisting control or authority
(there is more, but I only put in the relevant definition). I've never looked up the definition before, just assumed it was some sort of factory, but now it really makes sense - anarchy & resisting control or authority. Or maybe he taught 8th grade in Italy and that was teh real family secret.....