Saturday, November 01, 2008

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

Some pictures from my annual visit to Emo's Tomb every Halloween season. The actual Emo's Tomb. Why it's called Emo's Tomb is beyond me, that's not the name on it. But that's what I've known it as ever since I first heard of it in the 70's.

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9 comments:

A Paperback Writer said...

Well, are you going to fill us in? What the heck is Emo's tomb and why do you go there on Halloween? I assume it's an urban legend, but I've never heard it before.
The one I always heard in high school was that there were devil worshippers who met in Rotary Glen (uh, stupid. Now it was a big place for drugged out hippies 10 years earlier, but nobody ever found sacrificed cats there that I know of.).
And I've had kids where I teach swear up and down that there's a colony of mutant evil dwarves living down the street from you in that gulley across from Westminister.
Yeah, right. And they all sing the Lollipop Kid song if you get to close, I'm sure.
Anyhow, do tell us about Emo's tomb.

(Pity we could head back to Thompson. I bet that motel makes a heck of a scary site on Halloween.)

Max said...

Just for the record, there is a colony of dwarfs living on Allen Park Drive, although they are nice and prefer the term hobbit, the devil worshippers may sacrifice cats in Rotary Glen, but they live up that little road off the big curve in Emigration Canyon, you can call Emo out of the grave close to All Hallow's Eve and there is a gravitational reversal on the City Creek Canyon road right below the State Capitol. These are the urban legends of my high school days.
We called Allen Park Drive Hobbit Land , the gully on 15th East just below the high school was Middle Earth and during the nights close to Halloween we were told you could go up to the Salt Lake City Cemetery and summon the ghost named Emo. Never knew his full name, but supposedly you could stand in front of the tomb, which had a door in it with a window, call out Emo's name tghree times, while spinning around 3 times, ending up towards the window and you would see his face appear in the window. We had the guts to up to the cemetery in the middle of the night, hop the fence and walk up to the tomb, but none of us ever had the guts to complete the ritual.

A Paperback Writer said...

Uh, huh.
And did you take Tom Sawyer and a cat with you?
Well, thanks for explaining more. Hope you had a fun trip to the graveyard. It was probably more exciting than what I did for Halloween (grade tests, pass out candy to all four trick-or-treaters who showed up this year, and clean the house.)

Max said...

Hey, we were teenagers. And we didn't have online video games to play or DVDs to watch (we barely even had VCRs), so we needed stuff to occupy our time. Driving around taking on scary urban legends was one of them. I can't say we really beleived them, but it still got the adrenaline pumping driving up Emigration Canyon in the middle of the night looking for signs of devil worhsippers behind the fenced in compound. Yeah, it was the 70's.

A Paperback Writer said...

You HAD VCRs?!
Because the first one I ever saw in person (besides the school ones) belonged to a very rich neighbor for whom I used to babysit in 1980. You were long gone from high school then.
(The family had TWO videos: Mary Poppins and the original Star WArs. My friends were incredibly jealous because I got to watch Star Wars every time I'd gotten the kids to bed. No one else I knew had a VCR at the time. In fact, VCRs were still such a novelty, that when I was a senior, in the autumn of 1982, my friend Julie was allowed to rent one for her 18th birthday. She invited a whole bunch of us over to watch North By Northwest, and we thought it was the coolest thing ever to be able to watch a movie on your own TV with no commercials.
My parents bought a VCR in about 1987, but we (I was married by then, stupidly) couldn't afford one until about 1990 or so.
I didn't buy a DVD player until AFTER I moved back from Scotland in 2005. I bought my first DVDs to go with my laptop (which plays them) in 2004.
I still do not own an iPod (and I might not ever because ear buds and earphones make my ears ring. I never liked my Walkman much for the same reason.)

A Paperback Writer said...

Oh, and we (my female friends and I) used to pile in my 66 Beetle and cruise the Avenues on weekend nights, partly to drive by the houses of cute boys, partly to oogle the rich people's houses, and partly to hit all those bumps going downhill at about 50mph in a car with no shocks and iffy brakes.
Ah, the good old days.

Max said...

Well, my family didn't have a VCR, but we did know of them when I was in high school. They were the size of a small Volkswagen and watching them eject the tape was more fun that watching the movie itself. (They didn't simply eject the tape, this whole piece of the VCR lifted up and out of the machine, then sending out the tape. It was almost like an Apollo lift off).

A Paperback Writer said...

Who needs video games when you can just play with the VCR?
My friend used to have one of those early disc video players (1984). The discs looked like CDs, but they were the size of LPs. Not very many of those were made, I think.

Max said...

I found some of those video disks at my school and showed them to the students. They laughed when I told them they were the first DVDs.