Friday, February 06, 2015

Ok English Teachers:

Is it me, or is this wrong?

I could be wrong, but it just doesn’t sound right.

It comes from one of the examples in the district-approved online math book.  Supposed to be matching the situation to one of the graphs given.

7 comments:

Karen S. said...

I'm really curious what Lisa has to say about this.

Max Sartin said...

Me too!

Lisa Shafer said...

What???
I'm not even sure what this means. It's not a sentence, merely a noun modified by an adjective phrase, which is in turn modified by an adverb clause. The use of the subordinate clause "while you don't use your pencil" gives the impression that the pencil lead is one length while in use and a different length when not in use -- and that it fluctuates between these two lengths. The grammatical construction does not imply that the pencil lead gets shorter with use.
"The length of your pencil lead before use" or "the length of your pencil lead after use" would be much clearer.
Really, I had to read your example twice to make any sense of it at all, and I'm still not sure if that's what the test makers meant.

The English benchmarks are so poorly written that I give extra credit to my GT kids when they spot errors. I have a list of 7 or 8 errors, which I send to the district English head, each time. :)

Max Sartin said...

Good, I'm not just hallucinating bad grammar. And this is the awesome "book" that the district is requiring me to use. It's looking more and more like it's time to look into early retirement.

Lisa Shafer said...

You and I could always open a charter school. That's all that will be left in about 5 years anyway. :P

Karen S. said...

Finally, I just knew she'd have thoughts on this! Wonderful feedback.

Max Sartin said...

Well, if we decide to go for the charter school, I know a science teacher and special ed teacher that will be happy to join. Lotta teachers getting seriously sick and tired of all the bullshit we have to put up with - and not one has ever said it was the kids.